The Legacy Museum & Memorial2018-12-10T12:06:20+00:00

Project Description

Legacy Museum & Memorial

June 18-20

$584per person
  • Single Occupancy

June 18-20

$429per person
  • Double Occupancy

November 4-6

$584per person
  • Single Occupancy

November 4-6

$429per person
  • Double Occupancy

Visit The National Memorial for Peace and Justice and the Legacy Museum, informally known as the National Lynching Memorial. Built on the site of a former warehouse where slaves were housed, the Museum is located midway between an historic slave market and the main river dock and train station where tens of thousands of enslaved people were trafficked during the height of the domestic slave trade. Using interactive media, sculpture, videography, and exhibits, visitors are immersed in the sights and sounds of the domestic slave trade, racial intolerance, and the Jim Crow South. Compelling visuals and data-rich exhibits provide a one-of-a-kind opportunity to investigate America’s history of racial injustice and its legacy. More than 4400 African American men, women, and children were murdered by mobs between 1877 and 1950, with millions fleeing the South as refugees from racial terrorism, profoundly impacting the entire nation. Until now, there has been no national memorial acknowledging the victims of racial terror lynching’s. On this six-acre site atop a rise overlooking Montgomery, the national lynching memorial is a sacred space for truth-telling and reflection.

PRICE

Double Occupancy – $429 Per Person
Single Occupancy – $584 Per Person

Double Occupancy Early Bird Price – $399 Per Person
Single Occupancy Early Bird Price – $494 Per Person

Please see below for available Early Bird Pricing!

TRIP#

June 18-20, 2019 – 12530 – Book by March 18 for an Early Bird Price

November 4-6, 2019 – 12900 – Book by August 4 for an Early Bird Price

HIGHLIGHTS

  • Admission to The National Memorial for Peace and Justice
  • Admission to The Legacy Museum
  • Admission to the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site

INCLUDED

  • Roundtrip Motorcoach Transportation

  • 2 Nights’ Lodging

  • 4 Meals: 2 Breakfasts, 2 Dinners

  • Kelly Tours Escort

  • All taxes, baggage handling and travel arrangements

Meet your Kelly Tours coach and tour escort and travel west toward the state of Alabama. There will be plenty of rest stops and a stop for lunch (on own) in-route. Water and snacks will also be available onboard the coach. As we enter Montgomery, AL we’ll stop for an included buffet dinner at a “Martha’s Place,” a local favorite, before checking into our hotel for the night. D

After an included breakfast we will visit The National Memorial for Peace and Justice and the Legacy Museum, informally known as the National Lynching Memorial. Built on the site of a former warehouse where slaves were housed, the Museum is located midway between an historic slave market and the main river dock and train station where tens of thousands of enslaved people were trafficked during the height of the domestic slave trade. Using interactive media, sculpture, videography, and exhibits, visitors are immersed in the sights and sounds of the domestic slave trade, racial intolerance, and the Jim Crow South. Compelling visuals and data-rich exhibits provide a one-of-a-kind opportunity to investigate America’s history of racial injustice and its legacy. More than 4400 African American men, women, and children were murdered by mobs between 1877 and 1950, with millions fleeing the South as refugees from racial terrorism, profoundly impacting the entire nation. Until now, there has been no national memorial acknowledging the victims of racial terror lynching’s. On this six-acre site atop a rise overlooking Montgomery, the national lynching memorial is a sacred space for truth-telling and reflection. A farewell Dinner is included this evening at Dreamland BBQ. B D

Bid farewell to Montgomery after breakfast to begin the return trip home. Along the way, we’ll stop at the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic where we’ll learn about the contribution of African American airmen during World War II. These brave men and women were part of an experiment conducted by the Army Air Corps to see if African Americans “had the mental and physical capabilities to lead, fly military aircraft, and the courage to fight in war.” B